Month: December 2020

EP6: Katichisms

EP6: Katichisms

What’s the matter with Catholics? They are strangely over-represented in the conservative intellectual ranks. From William F. Buckley to Steve Bannon and many others, Catholics have long been the brains of the modern American right. On this holiday episode, we look at the Catholic intelligentsia, and the battle between left and right Catholic voices.

  • First, in host Gordon Katic’s opening essay, he discusses his Catholic upbringing. The young atheistic Gordon waged a war of attrition against his parents, and eventually won. Now, he looks at his Catholic upbringing and the broader Catholic intelligentsia with a certain amount of pride, and a certain amount of shame.
  • Next (@12:45), Kaya Oakes was raised Catholic, left the church, and then returned when she found Catholic leftists who did actually share her values. Today, Kaya is a writer, teacher, and essayist closely watching the contemporary battle for the soul of the church; a battle between a well-funded Catholic right, and a humble grassroots Catholic left.
  • Then (@27:19), Patrick Allitt is an historian of the modern American conservative movement. He too has noticed Catholics dominate the intellectual ranks, and his first book was on this very subject. He discusses William F. Buckley and the anti-Communist conservative Catholics, and explains why Catholicism and conservatism has become a match made in heaven.
  • Finally, (@41:45) Patrick O’Neill is a writer, journalist, and Catholic peace activist. On April 4th, 2018, he and 6 other Catholic activists broke into the Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base in Georgia to symbolically disarm the nuclear base. He faces 14 months in prison, which will begin in January 2021. It wouldn’t be the first time. Patrick tells us the story of his midnight sleuthing, of being in prison, and the broader movements of left-wing Catholic peace activism.

——————-SUPPORT THE SHOW——————-

We need your support. If you like what you hear, chip in. You can find us on patreon.com/dartsandletters. Patreon subscribers usually get the episode a day early, and sometimes will also receive bonus content.

Don’t have the money to chip in this week? Not to fear, you can help in other ways. For one: subscribe, rate, and review our podcast. It helps other people find our work.

—————————-CONTACT US————————-

To stay up to date, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. If you’d like to write us, email darts@citedmedia.ca or tweet Gordon directly.

—————————-CREDITS—————————-

This week, Darts and Letters was produced by Alex de Boer and Gordon Katic. The lead research assistant on this episode was Isabelle Lemelin, with consulting and support from David Moscrop and Andre Gagne.

Our theme song and music was created by Mike Barber, and our graphic design was created by Dakota Koop.

This episode received support by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research,  which provided us a research grant to look at the concept of “public intellectualism.” Professor Allen Sens at the University of British Columbia is the lead academic advisor. We are also supported by a wider project looking at the rise of far political ideologies – that project is run by Professors Andre Gagne., Ronald Beiner, and A. James McAdams.

This show is produced by Cited Media, which makes other great shows like Cited Podcast and Crackdown.

Darts and Letters is produced in Toronto, which is on the traditional land of Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishnabeg, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee and the Wendat Peoples. It is also produced in Vancouver, BC, which is on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations.

 

 

EP5: Prison Notebooks

EP5: Prison Notebooks

I can point you to mountains of research about prisons. I can also recommend at least a dozen Netflix documentaries, and highlight a handful of radical activists and scholars. There’s a lot of intellectual work done about prison. But what about intellectual work done in prison?

  • First, in the opening essay, host Gordon Katic discusses the long history of radical prison writing. From Thoreau to Gramsci, MLK, Oscar Wilde, Eugene Debs, Emma Goldman, and even Wittgenstein.
  • Next (@5:36), Chandra Bozelko served 6 years, three months, and 11 days in a women’s prison in Connecticut. While inside, she started an award-winning newspaper column. She tells us what writing did for her while inside, and what everyday prison intellectualism really looks like.
  • Then (@42:30), Justin Piché edits one of the most amazing academic journals you will ever come across. It’s called the Journal of Prisoners on Prisons. It has been around for over thirty years. In each and every edition, you will see brilliant scholarly work—it just so happens that this work is written by prisoners themselves

—————————-SUPPORT THE SHOW—————————-

We need your support. If you like what you hear, chip in. You can find us on patreon.com/dartsandletters. Patreon subscribers get the episode a day early, and sometimes will also receive bonus content.

Don’t have the money to chip in this week? Not to fear, you can help in other ways. For one: subscribe, rate, and review our podcast. It helps other people find our work.

—————————-CONTACT US————————-

To stay up to date, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. If you’d like to write us, email darts@citedmedia.ca or tweet Gordon directly.

—————————-CREDITS—————————-

This week, Darts and Letters was produced by Jay Cockburn. Research and support from David Moscrop and Addye Susnick. Our theme song and music was created by Mike Barber, and our graphic design was created by Dakota Koop.

This episode received support by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research, which provided us a research grant to look at the concept of “public intellectualism.” Professor Allen Sens at the University of British Columbia is the lead academic advisor.

This show is produced by Cited Media, which makes other great shows like Cited Podcast and Crackdown.

Darts and Letters is produced in Toronto, which is on the traditional land of Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishnabeg, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee and the Wendat Peoples. It is also produced in Vancouver, BC, which is on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations.

EP4.1: Auditing the Auditors

EP4.1: Auditing the Auditors

Our last episode, “the Conquest of Bread,” was about McKinsey and Co. encroaching on higher education. In this bonus episode, we put these developments in a wider context. That context: audit culture. Put simply, it’s governing by numbers.
Marc Spooner, professor of education, tells us about the wider intellectual history of audit culture, and why it’s so dangerous for higher education. You’ll hear about ‘the auditors’ from the Soviet Union, to Margaret Thatcher, Robert McNamara, and McKinsey. In education, audit culture happened to be sold with progressive aspirations, but so often it backfired. Marc gives a few strategies to students and scholars who are looking to resist audit culture, and stick to the principles of being true public intellectuals.
This is a bonus episode and an experiment. We’ll do this every now and again. It’s a companion piece and a loosely edited deep dive into the themes we discussed in the main episode. It’s for the real heads. If you like it (or if you don’t), let us know. If you want more episodes like this and other bonus materials, we’ll start making them more often. So chip in on patreon.com/dartsandletters.

—————————-CONTACT US————————-

To stay up to date, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. If you’d like to write us, email darts@citedmedia.ca or tweet Gordon directly.

—————————-CREDITS—————————-

This week, Darts and Letters was produced by Jay Cockburn. Our theme song and music was created by Mike Barber, and our graphic design was created by Dakota Koop.

This episode received support by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research, which provided us a research grant to look at the concept of “public intellectualism.” Professor Allen Sens at the University of British Columbia is the lead academic advisor. This is also part of a wider project looking at neoliberal educational reforms, led by Professor Marc Spooner at the University of Regina. Professor Spooner provided research consulting on this episode.

This show is produced by Cited Media, which makes other great shows like Cited Podcast and Crackdown.

Darts and Letters is produced in Toronto, which is on the traditional land of Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishnabeg, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee and the Wendat Peoples. It is also produced in Vancouver, BC, which is on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations.

EP4: The Conquest of Bread

EP4: The Conquest of Bread

You know McKinsey and Co. They worked for a company that was fixing the price of bread in Canada.  They helped on Trump’s immigration policies, but their ideas were too extreme even for ICE. More recently, they proposed that Purdue Pharma “turbocharge” their sales of OxyContin by offering $14,810 rebates for ODs. Yeah, that’s McKinsey.

We could go on and on. They have a long and sordid record as ‘capitalism’s willing executioners,’ to quote a Current Affairs article by an insider. Now, they’re coming onto our turf: higher education. So, we take a closer look. What is even is management consulting, and is there anything to the methods?

  • First, in his opening essay, host Gordon Katic reminds listeners of the infamous case of General Motors and the side saddle gas tank defect of the 1970s and 80s. This story takes us to the world of cost-benefit analysis; a cold, hard logic that puts profits above people.
  • Next (@7:52), Kate Jacobson is co-host of the podcast Alberta Advantage, a left-wing podcast in the heart of Canadian conservatism. She warns us that Premier Jason Kenney is using McKinsey as a pretext for his slash-and-burn approach to higher education.
  • Then, (@30:33) Matthew Stewart turned away from a potential career in academic philosophy to enter the world of management consulting. His tell-all book The Management Myth: Debunking the Modern Philosophy of Business takes us through his own time in consulting, and the broader intellectual history of management science—AKA the art of wringing every last ounce of labour from workers.
  • Finally (@53:14), Joel Westheimer is University Research Chair in Democracy and Education at the University of Ottawa. His work asks the basic, core question “what is education for?” He thinks McKinsey does not know how to measure what really counts about education—because ‘not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts.’

—————————-SUPPORT THE SHOW—————————-

We need your support. If you like what you hear, chip in. You can find us on patreon.com/dartsandletters. Patreon subscribers get the episode a day early, and sometimes will also receive bonus content.

Don’t have the money to chip in this week? Not to fear, you can help in other ways. For one: subscribe, rate, and review our podcast. It helps other people find our work.

—————————-CONTACT US————————-

To stay up to date, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. If you’d like to write us, email darts@citedmedia.ca or tweet Gordon directly.

—————————-CREDITS—————————-

This week, Darts and Letters was produced by Jay Cockburn. The lead research assistant on this episode was Franklynn Bartol, with support from our research coordinator David Moscrop.

Our theme song and music was created by Mike Barber, and our graphic design was created by Dakota Koop.

This episode received support by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research, which provided us a research grant to look at the concept of “public intellectualism.” Professor Allen Sens at the University of British Columbia is the lead academic advisor. This is also part of a wider project looking at neoliberal educational reforms, led by Professor Marc Spooner at the University of Regina. Professor Spooner provided research consulting on this episode.

This show is produced by Cited Media, which makes other great shows like Cited Podcast and Crackdown.

Darts and Letters is produced in Toronto, which is on the traditional land of Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishnabeg, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee and the Wendat Peoples. It is also produced in Vancouver, BC, which is on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations.

 

EP3.1: Decoding Dominionism

EP3.1: Decoding Dominionism

You liked our last episode, Pew Research Center, so I wanted to bring you more. We were just scratching the surface on far-right political theology. On this bonus episode, Andre Gagne takes us deeper. We talk through an intellectual history of the key ideas — Christian Dominionism, Prosperity Gospel, and the Seven Mountains — and its key players.
This is a bonus episode and an experiment. It’s a companion piece and a loosely edited deep dive into the themes we discussed in the last episode. It’s for the real heads. If you like it (or if you don’t), let me know. If you want more episodes like this and other bonus materials, we’ll start making them more often. And if we have money to do it, they’ll get better and better. So chip in on patreon.com/dartsandletters.

—————————-CONTACT US————————-

To stay up to date, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. If you’d like to write us, email darts@citedmedia.ca or tweet Gordon directly.

—————————-CREDITS—————————-

This week, Darts and Letters was produced by Jay Cockburn and Gordon Katic. The lead research assistant on this episode was Isabelle Lemelin, with support from David Moscrop, and consulting from Andre Gagne.

Our theme song and music was created by Mike Barber, and our graphic design was created by Dakota Koop.

This episode received support by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research,  which provided us a research grant to look at the concept of “public intellectualism.” Professor Allen Sens at the University of British Columbia is the lead academic advisor. We are also supported by a wider project looking at the rise of far political ideologies – that project is run by Professors Andre GagneRonald Beiner, and A. James McAdams.

This show is produced by Cited Media, which makes other great shows like Cited Podcast and Crackdown.

Darts and Letters is produced in Toronto, which is on the traditional land of Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishnabeg, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee and the Wendat Peoples. It is also produced in Vancouver, BC, which is on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations.

EP3: Pew Research Center

EP3: Pew Research Center

You’ve seen hilarious videos of the evangelicals for Trump. You might be inclined to ignore them, mock their excesses, or dismiss their threat. But the evangelical right is a force to be reckoned with, even with Trump on his way out. So, who are these evangelicals? What do they believe?

For years, evangelicals have been plotting a political course, a far-right “theology” that includes Christian nationalism and spiritual warfare. It’s paying off. And we need to understand why it works, and for whom. This is the first in a series of episodes we’ll be releasing that examine the political philosophies of radical right-wing movements.

  • First (@8:16), Andre Gagne is a former evangelical, once “saved,” who turned away from the light of the Church to become a professor. He talks about what he found in the church, the power of “narrative theology,” why he left the church, and why so much of the evangelical experience is powerful – and disconcerting.
  • Then (@37:24), Chrissy Stroop is an author, activist, and former Christian who has gone from Jesusland to Twitterland. She shares her journey with Gordon, including her creation of #emptythepews, a hashtag that marks the stories of people leaving the church. She warns of the power of fundamentalist enclaves, powerful ecosystems that exist on their own but also reach into the world to draw entrants into them.
  • Finally (@1:03:21), Bradley Onishi is a pastor turned professor turned podcaster who Ben Shapiro calls “that religion professor.” He takes on the so-called intellectuals of the far right through his academic research and the podcast he co-hosts with Dan Miller, Straight White American JesusOnishi doing his part to keep the discourse honest, a job that is as essential as it is Sisyphean.

——————-SUPPORT THE SHOW——————-

We need your support. If you like what you hear, chip in. You can find us on patreon.com/dartsandletters. Patreon subscribers get the episode a day early, and sometimes will also receive bonus content.

Don’t have the money to chip in this week? Not to fear, you can help in other ways. For one: subscribe, rate, and review our podcast. It helps other people find our work.

—————————-CONTACT US————————-

To stay up to date, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. If you’d like to write us, email darts@citedmedia.ca or tweet Gordon directly.

—————————-CREDITS—————————-

This week, Darts and Letters was produced by Jay Cockburn and Gordon Katic. The lead research assistant on this episode was Isabelle Lemelin, with support from David Moscrop, and consulting from Andre Gagne.

Our theme song and music was created by Mike Barber, and our graphic design was created by Dakota Koop.

This episode received support by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research,  which provided us a research grant to look at the concept of “public intellectualism.” Professor Allen Sens at the University of British Columbia is the lead academic advisor. We are also supported by a wider project looking at the rise of far political ideologies – that project is run by Professors Andre Gagne., Ronald Beiner, and A. James McAdams.

This show is produced by Cited Media, which makes other great shows like Cited Podcast and Crackdown.

Darts and Letters is produced in Toronto, which is on the traditional land of Mississaugas of the Credit, the Anishnabeg, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee and the Wendat Peoples. It is also produced in Vancouver, BC, which is on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations.